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Style Los Angeles Fashion Week Spring Summer 2014

November 9th, 2013 · No Comments

Tina Hughes for Tina Marie Photo: Elva Zevallos

Tina Hughes for Tina Marie
Photo: Elva Zevallos

A Season of Change for LA’s Premier Fashion Event By Elva Zevallos LOS ANGELES, CA (Hollywood Today) 2013/11/9 – “My whole kind of style I label modern vintage,” says fashion designer Tina Hughes in an exclusive interview with Hollywood Today. ”I always tend to look for clean silhouettes, staple pieces and add a little bit of vintage to it.  Maybe it is a little bit of the silhouette or maybe it’s the detail.” October 13th to 17th, 2013, marked the sixth Season of Style Fashion Week L.A. That has blossomed into a season of change with its move from the St. Vibiana cathedral to its debut at the L.A. Live Event Deck in downtown Los Angeles.  Located a mile away from the L.A. Fashion District, this new location offered fashion industry insiders and invited guests room to gather inside a forty-two thousand square foot tent to view the highly anticipated final night of a week of fashion shows for the Spring 2014 season. A welcome change to Style Fashion Week L.A. occurred when Councilman Currin Price of the 9th district opened the final night by taking to the runway and announcing that on behalf of the city of Los Angeles that Style Fashion Week L.A. would now be designated as the official L.A. Fashion Week.  The response from everyone in attendance was cheering and applause that subsided only with the announcement that the first designer of the evening was ready to begin her show.
Tina Hughes for Tina Marie Photo: Elva Zevallos

Tina Hughes for Tina Marie
Photo: Elva Zevallos

One of the standouts in this collection, which also clearly illustrated the theme of  modern vintage,  was this striking silk dress whose green and black print was co-created by the designer.  Hughes revealed her inspiration for the design.  “Early glamour, late 1930′s, long flowing silhouette that just really fits the body and then you have that hint of skin, the arms or the back,” says Hughes. “Just that little bit of skin yet keeping it modest.  I feel that so many people could wear this dress and that’s how I like to design.  I try not to fit just one age group.  Maybe someone in their twenties would want to wear it.  Maybe someone in their forties would want to wear it.  Definitely, I was really inspired by old fashion Hollywood glamour with this dress silhouette-wise.”

 

Design by Silvia Bours Photo:  Liza Rosales

Design by Silvia Bours
Photo: Liza Rosales

The theme from The Phantom of the Opera heralded the designs of Silvia Bours who presented an array of ultra feminine cocktail dresses.  The color palette of this collection consisted of blush, cream and ivory with the occasional silver and pastel blue also featured.  The sweetheart necklines in this collection were a delicate staple with the powerful effect of providing a perfect frame for the decolletage.
Design by Silvia Bours Photo:  Liza Rosales

Design by Silvia Bours
Photo: Liza Rosales

Although the vast majority of gowns in this collection were cocktail length, it was this full length evening gown with its lace, crystal and pearl detailing that had people diving for their cameras to capture the image.


Design byCristina Nitopi Photo:  Liza Rosales

Design byCristina Nitopi
Photo: Liza Rosales

Following Silvia Bours was the collection of Cristina Nitopi.  There was an abundance of neutral color in Nitopi’s color palette as well as splashes of fiery red and cerulean blue.  What was outstanding in this collection were the bold asymmetrical silhouettes which with very few exceptions allowed for the graceful flow of each dress.
Design by Cristina Nitopi Photo:  Liza Rosales

Design by Cristina Nitopi
Photo: Liza Rosales

All of Nitopi’s models sported hairstyles evocative of the 1940′s in terms of textured rolls courtesy of stylists from Prive.  Prive’s at times edgy interpretation of a classic hairstyle was a complement to a collection that also infused elements of risk into its design.
Jelena Vujanovic for Vilorija Photo:  Liza Rosales

Jelena Vujanovic for Vilorija
Photo: Liza Rosales

“As much as woman is feminine she should always be actually, strong,” says Jelena Vujanovic.  “I like to use that contrast of something very fragile, of looking very fragile and very feminine and very sophisticated but actually being very dynamic and strong.”  This philosophy was boldly manifested in Blume, the Spring 2014 collection from Vujanovic’s label, Vilorija and the fourth show of the evening.  Beautifully constructed from silk satin (with one or two dresses made from cotton) there were designs in this collection that made generous use of crinoline to give skirts an eye-catching flare.
Jelena Vujanovic for Vilorija Photo:  Liza Rosales

Jelena Vujanovic for Vilorija
Photo: Liza Rosales

The designs that fell closer to the body seemed to have an extra detail that facilitated the kind of movement that demanded your attention such as this violet silk dress with the tiered skirt.  Honestly, you have to see this dress in motion to truly appreciate it.
Jelena Vujanovic for Vilorija Photo:  Liza Rosales

Jelena Vujanovic for Vilorija
Photo: Liza Rosales

Where are the “strong” and “dynamic” elements in this collection?  The ones that celebrate a woman’s strength?  Vujanovic revealed that they were all present in the colors  Indeed the color palette had bold range of shades inclusive of  violet, teal, orange, red and fuchsia.  Black was also used but detailed with one or more of the aforementioned hues.  It can be a challenge to create a line that infuses opposing elements.  Vilorija not only infused them in this collection but made them harmonious.
Furne One for Amato Haute Couture Photo:  Liza Rosales

Furne One for Amato Haute Couture
Photo: Liza Rosales

“Do you think you know the difference between good and evil?” This was the provocative question asked in the video that introduced the final fashion show of the night, the collection from Furne One’s label, Amato.  The colors used in this particular line were predominantly black, representing evil, and white, representing good.  The dresses depicting the forces of evil  had such embellishments as long flowing capes and spiky head gear.  Those representing the forces of good were accessorized with angel wings and halos just to name a few adornments.
Furne One for Amato Haute Couture Photo:  Liza Rosales

Furne One for Amato Haute Couture
Photo: Liza Rosales

There was the aura  of the phantasmagoric throughout this entire collection( irrespective of which side was being represented) that grabbed the attention of a very captive audience and wouldn’t let go.  A triumphant end to a week that flew by much too soon.


All photos by Liza Rosales unless otherwise noted.

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